New Test for 100mph Law-breakers

Speed camera survey


New government proposals may mean that drivers caught speeding at over 100mph will face tougher tests before they get their licence back. The extended test is already in existence for some offences, but not for excessive speeding. If a driver has been banned for more than 56 days for dangerous driving, drink driving or a number of other serious offences they are required to take the extended test, and the number of offences for which this can be required is set to be increased. Last year over 5000 drivers had to take the test in order to reclaim their licence.

Latest Figures

The latest figures, available from the Ministry of Justice, show that 9000 motorists were banned for a speeding offence last year, and this figure could be boosted by a further 1000 if the new proposals are upheld. The current guidelines say that anyone caught in excess of the speed limit by 30mph gets an immediate ban. The proposals mean that the new test will be twice the length of the standard road test and, at £124, will cost twice as much. The current extended test is likely to be revised on nature.

A Timely Move

Motoring groups, in general, welcomed the proposals, with Robert Gifford, of the Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety, explaining:

“This is a timely move to ensure that the requirement to take an extended driving test also has an educational dimension. Carrying a driving licence is a significant responsibility and drivers need to be reminded of that. This should ensure that the extended driving test for serious offenders is fit for purpose.”

There is also a proposal that will see the blood test rules in drink-driving cases altered, with drivers being unable to request a second blood or urine test. This is commonly used as a time wasting tactic as it can take some time to arrange, hence giving the culprit extra time to sober up. With accidents on the rise in the UK, thanks to the 30million – and rising – vehicles on the roads, such moves to make the roads safer should be welcomed by all.

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